BBC: You can’t indict Rwanda’s government by denying the 1994 genocide

The Rwandan genocide of 1994 is recognised by all who have studied it seriously as one of the largest-scale, most concentrated episodes of mass murder in the last century. About 800,000 people, mostly Tutsis but also Hutus who opposed the Hutu Power regime, were killed in a matter of weeks. Frequently compared to the Armenian… Continue reading BBC: You can’t indict Rwanda’s government by denying the 1994 genocide

Once more on ‘left-wing’ genocide denial

The Guardian journalist George Monbiot has written a further article, 'See No Evil', on the denial by Edward Herman and David Peterson of the Rwandan genocide of 1994 and the genocidal massacre at Srebrenica, Bosnia, in 1995, in their book The Politics of Genocide which includes a supportive Preface by Noam Chomsky. Monbiot is responding… Continue reading Once more on ‘left-wing’ genocide denial

‘Left-wing’ genocide denial

George Monbiot has written an interesting take in The Guardian on 'left-wing' denial of the Srebrenica genocidal massacre and the Rwandan genocide, Left and libertarian right cohabit in the weird world of the genocide belittlers. Monbiot refers to the recent book by Edward Herman (Noam Chomsky's collaborator of four decades) and David Peterson, with a… Continue reading ‘Left-wing’ genocide denial

Zimbabwe and the new divide in world politics, May 2000

from http://www.martinshaw.org/politics/0005zimbabwe.htm The threatening situation in Zimbabwe puts in sharp relief the new lines of division in the global era, which are replacing the old divides of twentieth-century world politics. The lesson is all the more striking since Zimbabwe has marked, in the last month, only the 20th anniversary of its independence - the conclusion… Continue reading Zimbabwe and the new divide in world politics, May 2000

Richard Gott on Zimbabwe, letter to New Statesman, 15 May 2000

from http://www.newstatesman.com/200005150035 So Richard Gott, with his unerring progressive instincts, chooses the moment when Robert Mugabe's thugs are killing white farmers (and oppositionists generally) to tell us that, because of the crimes of their forefathers, these people should have got out of Zimbabwe. Since the Nazi Reich forms such a seminal part of his historical… Continue reading Richard Gott on Zimbabwe, letter to New Statesman, 15 May 2000